Humor #66

On a visit to Boston, I noticed a parking meter with a paper sack over it upon which was written: “Broken.”

A skeptical parking officer removed the bag, inserted a quarter in the meter and turned the dial. It worked perfectly. As the officer began to write a parking ticket, the car’s owner rushed out of a nearby building.

“What are you doing?” he yelled after a quick glance at the meter. “There’s plenty of time left!”

—–

A stuffy old dowager was explaining to the Jewish florist how she wanted the flowers arranged at the DAR (Daughters of the American Revolution) meeting to celebrate the signing of the Declaration of Independence.

“Actually,” she said, “one of my ancestors was present at the presentation of the document to the Congress.”

“How very nice.” replied Morris the florist. “One of my mine was present at the presentation of the Ten Commandments to the world.”

—–

“Don’t let people drive you crazy when you know it’s in walking distance.”

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My mother was recently on a flight returning from Utah. As the plane was a small puddle jumper, the flight attendants were required to demonstrate the life vest, the oxygen mask, etc. instead of turning on a video.

After they finished their presentation, one of them said “To those of you who listened, thank you. To those of you who ignored us, good luck.”

—–

I put some turnips, my eleven-year-old son’s least-favorite vegetable, on his dinner plate and instructed him to eat everything. He cleaned his plate, except for the turnip.

I pointed out to him that if he’d eaten it earlier, he wouldn’t have been left with its taste in his mouth at the end of the meal.

Thoughtfully, he replied, “I guess I was just trying to delay the inedible.”

—–

One afternoon a man came home from work to find total mayhem in his house. His three children were outside, still in their pajamas, playing in the mud, with empty food boxes and wrappers strewn all around the front yard. The door of his wife’s car was open, as was the front door to the house.

Proceeding into the entry, he found an even bigger mess. A lamp had been knocked over, and the throw rug was wadded against one wall. In the front room the TV was loudly blaring a cartoon channel, and the family room was strewn with toys and various items of clothing. In the kitchen, dishes filled the sink, breakfast food was spilled on the counter, dog food was spilled on the floor, a broken glass lay under the table, and a small pile of sand was spread by the back door.

He quickly headed up the stairs, stepping over toys and more piles of clothes, looking for his wife. He was worried she may be ill, or that something serious had happened. He found her lounging in the bedroom, still curled in the bed in her pajamas, reading a novel. She looked up at him, smiled, and asked how his day went.

He looked at her bewildered and asked, “What happened here today?”

She again smiled and answered, “You know every day when you come home from work and ask me what in the world I did today?”

“Yes” was his incredulous reply.

She answered, “Well, today I didn’t do it.”

——————-

One day I found Morris, my five-year-old son, with the telephone, which he quickly hung up when he saw me. “What were you doing?” I asked him.

“Calling Aunt Sarah.”

“How could you have called Aunt Sarah?” I asked. “You don’t even know her number.”

“Yes, I do and I did call her,” little Morris replied.

I wasted a lot of breath trying to convince him that he didn’t know her number, but he insisted he had made the call. “Okay,” I said finally. “What did she say, then, if you called her?”

“She told me I had the wrong number.”

———————

At a local church, the members take pride in the reverent behavior of the children during the sermons.

Asked how they engendered this profound respect for the Almighty, one elder explained to me:

“In each batch of new Sunday schoolers, I casually mention that we had to fire the artist who made the stained glass roof panels. I say he got fired for putting bad words in some of the artwork. Now, when energetic little boys get bored, they spend their time staring straight up!”

——————

One afternoon while I was visiting my library, I noticed a group of preschoolers gathered for story time. The book they were reading was, “There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly.”

After the librarian finished the first page, she asked the children, “Do you think she’ll die?”

“Nope,” a little girl in the back said. “I saw this last night on ‘Fear Factor.'”

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