Humor #73

“I got one of those new devices that make my cell phone ‘hands free’ – now I can get back to eating and drinking when I drive.”

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The Sixties, yes, the Sixties. Time of hope, time of rebellion, time for planning new ways to do things, ways that could not be any worse than what was being done at that time.

In contrast to most of the other movements of the time, one very active group combined militant vegetarianism (not so uncommon) with militant prohibitionism (very uncommon). They believed, in fact, that the first would automatically lead to perfect health. Eat only vegetables, love one another, and the desire and drive to consume Demon Rum would just pass away.

They believed that: “Peas would rule the planets, and love would clear the bars. It was the dawning of the age of asparagus.”

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After a long, bumpy flight, our passengers were glad to finally land.

They disembarked, and the other attendants and I checked for items left behind.

In a seat pocket, I found a bag of home-made cookies with a note saying “Much love, Mom.”

Quickly, I gave the bag to our gate agent in hopes it would be reunited with its owner.

In few minutes, this announcement came over the public-address system in the concourse:

“Would the passenger who lost his cookies on Flight 502, please return to the gate?”

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A minister parked his car in a no-parking zone in a large city because he was short of time and couldn’t find a space with a meter. Then he put a note under the windshield wiper that read: “I have circled the block 10 times. If I don’t park here, I’ll miss my appointment. Forgive us our trespasses.”

When he returned, he found a citation from a police officer along with this note: “I’ve circled this block for 10 years. If I don’t give you a ticket I’ll lose my job. ‘Lead us not into temptation.'”

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After years of being blasted into a net, the human cannonball went to the circus owner and told him he was going to retire.

“But you can’t!” shouted the cigar-chomping boss. “Where am I going to find a man of your caliber?”

As it turned out, the human cannonball who replaced him was hired and fired the same night.

—–

Anthony, my four-year-old grandson, was excited about the story he had learned at Christian day school. “Grandma,” he said enthusiastically, “it’s about a woman God told not to look back.”

“You mean Lot’s wife?” I asked.

“Yes,” Anthony’s face brightened. “And you know what? She looked back and turned into the Statue of Liberty!”

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A young scholar from New York was invited to become Rabbi in a small old community in Chicago.

On his very first Shabbat, a hot debate erupted as to whether one should or should not stand during the reading of the Ten Commandments.

The next day, the rabbi visited 98 year-old Mr. Katz in the nursing home.

“Mr. Katz, I’m asking you, as the oldest member of the community,” said the rabbi, “what is our synagogue’s custom during the reading of the Ten Commandments?”

“Why do you ask?” asked Mr. Katz.

“Yesterday we read the Ten Commandments. Some people stood, some people sat. The ones standing started screaming at the ones sitting, telling them to stand up. The ones sitting started screaming at the ones standing, telling them to sit down… ”

“That,” said the old man, “is our custom.”

 —–

In a grocery store a cashier held up a small dairy carton and yelled to a co-worker, “How much is half-and-half?”

Without a moment’s hesitation the other cashier replied, “One.”

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