Humor #220

Malapropisms

(For those who might not know, a malapropism is a verbal blunder in which one word is replaced by another similar in sound but different in meaning.)

People who live beyond their means should act their wage.

If your wife wants to learn to drive, don’t stand in her way.

The image of you playing Frisbee with a dog isn’t so farfetched.

The wise never marry, and when they marry, they become otherwise.

He’s a wolf in cheap clothing.

It was a case of love at Versailles.

He’s got one of those sight-seeing dogs.

In Algiers, they spend most of their time at the cash bar.

My sister has extra-century perception.

A fool and his money are some party.

All’s fear in love and war.

Nip it in the butt.

Some viruses can lie doormat for years.

To each his zone.

Michelangelo painted the Sixteenth Chapel.

No more negotiating – it’s a dumb deal.

It’s a long road to hold.

All I want from you kids is a little piece of quiet.

Perforation is a rip off.

What do you call a sleepwalking nun?
A Roaming Catholic.

Humor #219

Dilbert’s Laws of Work

A pat on the back is only a few centimeters from a kick in the rear.

Don’t be irreplaceable. If you can’t be replaced, you can’t be promoted.

You can go anywhere you want if you look serious and carry a clipboard.

Eat one live toad the first thing in the morning and nothing worse will happen to you the rest of the day.

When the bosses talk about improving productivity, they are never talking about themselves.

If at first you don’t succeed, try again. Then quit. No use being a fool about it.

Everything can be filed under “miscellaneous.”

Never delay the ending of a meeting or the beginning of a cocktail hour.

To err is human, to forgive is not our policy.

Anyone can do any amount of work provided it isn’t the work he/she is supposed to be doing.

If you are good, you will be assigned all the work. If you are really good, you will get out of it.

You are always doing something marginal when the boss drops by your desk.

People who go to conferences are the ones who shouldn’t.

If it wasn’t for the last minute, nothing would get done.

When you don’t know what to do, walk fast and look worried.

When confronted by a difficult problem you can solve it more easily by reducing it to the question, “How would the Lone Ranger handle this?”

No matter how much you do, you never do enough.

Humor #218

Reasons You Should Buy a New Car

Your passenger seat is on the National Register of Historic Places.

Instead of an air bag, there is a whoopee cushion taped to your steering wheel.

You lose the stoplight challenge to a 14-year-old on a moped.

The 15-minute Jiffy Lube needs to keep your car for three days.

When you gas up, the attendant asks, “Can I re-duct tape that windshield for you?”

Thieves repeatedly break in to your car just to steal the “Club.”

While sitting at a stop light, people keep running up to you and asking if anyone was hurt.

For the last five years, you’ve had to settle for making “vroom, vroom” noises while in the driveway.

You keep losing dates on left turns.

Humor #217

Homework Policy

Here is an explanation of the school homework policy:

Students should not spend more than 90 minutes per night. This time should be budgeted in the following manner:

15 minutes looking for assignment.
11 minutes calling a friend for the assignment.
23 minutes explaining why the teacher is mean and just does not like children.
8 minutes in the bathroom.
10 minutes getting a snack.
7 minutes checking the TV Guide.
6 minutes telling parents that the teacher never explained the assignment.
10 minutes sitting at the kitchen table waiting for Mom or Dad to do the assignment.

Humor #216

Why Teachers Go Gray

These are reported to be actual test answers from various schools in the Huntsville, Alabama metropolitan area:

Q: Name the four seasons.
A: Salt, pepper, mustard and vinegar.

Q: How is dew formed?
A: The sun shines down on the leaves and makes them perspire.

Q: What is a planet?
A: A body of earth surrounded by sky.

Q: What guarantees may a mortgage company insist on?
A: If you are buying a house, they will insist you are well endowed.

Q; Name a major disease associated with cigarettes.
A: Premature death.

Q: How can you delay milk turning sour?
A: Keep it in the cow.

Q: How are the main parts of the body categorized?
A: The body is consisted into three parts – the brainium, the borax and the abdominal cavity. The brainium contains the brain, the borax contains the heart and lungs and the abdominal cavity contains the five bowels, A, E, I, O, and U.

Q: What is the fibula?
A: A small lie.

Q: What does “varicose” mean?
A: Nearby.

Q: Give the meaning of the term “Caesarean Section.”
A: The caesarean section is a district in Rome.

Q: What is a seizure?
A: A Roman emperor.

Q: What is a terminal illness?
A: When you are sick at the airport.

Q: Use the word “judicious” in a sentence to show you understand its meaning.
A: Hands that judicious can be soft as your face.

Q: What does the word “benign” mean?
A: Benign is what you will be after you be eight.

Q: What is a turbine?
A: Something an Arab wears on his head.

Q: What is a Hindu?
A: It lays eggs.

Humor #215

Tips For Student Pilots

1. Takeoffs are optional. Landings are mandatory.

2. If you push the stick forward, the houses get bigger. If you pull the stick back, they get smaller.

3. Flying isn’t dangerous. Crashing is dangerous.

4. It’s always better to be down here wishing you were up there than up there wishing you were down here.

5. The only time you have too much fuel is when you’re on fire.

6. The propeller is just a big fan in front of the plane used to keep the pilot cool. When it stops, you can actually watch the pilot start sweating.

7. When in doubt, hold on to your altitude. No one has ever collided with the sky.

8. A “good” landing is one from which you can walk away. A “great” landing is one after which they can use the plane again.

9. Learn from the mistakes of others. You won’t live long enough to make all of them yourself.

10. You know you’ve landed with the wheels up if it takes full power to taxi to the ramp.

11. The probability of survival is inversely proportional to the angle of arrival. Large angle of arrival equals a small probability of survival — and vice versa.

12. Never let an airplane take you somewhere your brain didn’t get to five minutes earlier.

13. Stay out of clouds. The silver lining everyone keeps talking about might be another airplane going in the opposite direction.

14. Reliable sources also report that mountains have been known to hide out in clouds.

15. There are three simple rules for making a smooth landing. Unfortunately, no one knows what they are.

16. You start with a bag full of luck and an empty bag of experience. The trick is to fill the bag of experience before you empty the bag of luck.

17. Keep looking around. There’s always something you’ve missed.

18. If all you can see out of the windscreen is ground that’s going round and round and all you can hear is commotion coming from the passenger compartment, things are not at all as they should be.

19. In the ongoing battle between objects made of aluminum going hundreds of miles per hour and the ground going zero miles per hour, the ground has yet to lose.

20. Good judgment comes from experience. Unfortunately, experience usually comes from bad judgment.

21. It’s always a good idea to keep the pointy end going forward as much as possible.

22. There are old pilots and there are bold pilots. There are, however, no old, bold pilots.

23. Remember, gravity is not just a good idea. It’s the law. And it’s not subject to repeal.

24. Always try to keep the number of landings you make equal to the number of takeoffs you’ve made.

25. The three most useless things to a pilot are altitude above you, runway behind you, and a tenth of a second ago.

And a bonus tip:

Helicopters can’t fly; they’re just so ugly the earth repels them.

Humor #214

Carpool   (agroaner)

A recent college graduate took a new job in a hilly Eastern city and began commuting each day to work through a tiring array of tunnels, bridges, and traffic jams.

To make the task less onerous, he invited several of his co-workers to share the ride.

He soon found, however, that the commute continued to get more stressful, especially the trips through the tunnels. He consulted the company doctor.

“Doc,” the frustrated commuter complained, “I’m fine on the bridges, in the traffic, in the day and at night, and even when Joe forgets to bathe all week long. But when I get into the tunnels and I’ve got those four other guys crowded around me in the car, I get anxious and dizzy and feel like I’m going to explode.”

Without further analysis, the doctor announced he had identified the ailment.

“What is it, Doc? Am I going insane?”

“No, no, no, my boy. You have something very common in these parts.”

“Tell me! What is it?”

“You have what is known as Carpool Tunnel Syndrome.”