Humor #361

Nothing is fool-proof to a talented fool.

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That SpongeBob: so self-absorbed.

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A literature buff, my friend Larry installed an answering machine on his telephone. Instead of the usual instructions about leaving a message, Larry recorded a parody of Hamlet’s famous soliloquy:

“To speak, or not to speak, that is the question. Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to leave a message after the beep, or to take arms against a sea of answering machines, and by opposing, end them. To dial, to speak, no more. Thus answering machines do make cowards of us all.”

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Mrs. Jones was reading a letter at breakfast.

Suddenly she looked up suspiciously at her husband.

“Henry,” she said, “I’ve just received a letter from mother saying she isn’t accepting our invitation to come and stay, as we do not appear to want her. What does she mean by that? I told you to write and say that she was to come at her own convenience. You did write, didn’t you?”

“Er, yes, I did,” said the husband. “But I couldn’t spell convenience, so I made it risk.”

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I got my stomach by doing as many crunches as I can everyday; usually either Nestle or Captain.

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A man visited a psychiatrist to talk about his dreams. “Every night,” the man said, “I dream that these three hideous monsters are sitting on the edge of my bed, ready to attack me.”

“Hmmm,” said the doctor. “I feel sure I can cure you of this problem. But the treatment will cost you somewhere between twenty-five and thirty thousand dollars.”

“Thirty thousand dollars!” the man gasped. “Never mind getting rid of the monsters, Doctor. I think I’ll go home and try to make friends with them!”

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It seems this Goober was wanting a dog for a pet, so he went to the local pet store to buy one.

He asked the clerk “how much are your dogs?”

She replied, “They are $10.00 apiece.”

The goober replied, “How much for a whole one?!”

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Statistics show that statistics can’t be trusted.

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In one small rural town the sheriff also fulfilled the role of the town’s veterinarian.

One night the phone rang, and his wife answered.

An agitated voice inquired, “Is your husband there?”

“He is, but tell me, do you need him as the sheriff or the vet?” the wife asked.

“Both!” was the reply.

“We can’t get our dog’s mouth open, and there’s a burglar in it.”

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Hamburger Helper: It works, but only if the hamburger is ready to accept the fact that it needs help.

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The staff at a business office was hosting a farewell luncheon for a retiring colleague. As the group prepared to go to the restaurant, they found that they couldn’t fit the giant balloon they had purchased for the retiring ‘guest of honor’ into the car. Undaunted, they simply held the balloon out the window as they drove.

The office workers were not prepared for the glares they received from passers-by, however.

As the long line of traffic in front of their vehicle began to turn, they saw that their car was right behind a long funeral procession.

There was nothing they could do but hold on to the balloon with its large farewell message: “GONE, BUT NOT FORGOTTEN.”

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A young man is an avid listener to the city’s police frequency, and he leaves the scanner on all the time.

One morning while making his bed, he heard the dispatcher say,

“Car 34, there is a five-foot boa constrictor in someone’s front yard. The resident wants a police officer to come and remove it.”

There was a long pause, then some static.

Slowly, a voice said, “We can’t get the car started.”

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Buyer Beware: Shopping malls have benches, so guys can sit while they give up the will to live.

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While walking through a parking lot, I tripped and fell flat on my face. As I was lying there, a woman stopped her car and called out, “Are you hurt?”

“No, I’m fine,” I said.

“Oh, good,” she continued. “Will you be vacating your parking space now?”

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You can’t run through a campground – you can only ran because it’s past tents.

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A woman brought her baby in to see the doctor, and he determined right away the baby had an earache.

He wrote a prescription for ear drops. In the directions he wrote, “Put two drops in right ear every four hours” and he abbreviated “right” as an R with a circle around it.

Several days passed, and the woman returned with her baby, complaining that the baby still had an earache, and his little behind was getting really greasy with all those drops of oil.

The doctor looked at the bottle of eardrops and sure enough, the pharmacist had typed the following instructions on the label:

“Put two drops in R ear every four hours.”

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